Here’s Why We Don’t Need A “White History Month”

Here’s Why We Don’t Need A “White History Month”Watch as we break down why Black History Month exists — and why “White History Month” doesn’t.

Posted by HuffPost Black Voices on Monday, February 1, 2016

Honoring our 25th Anniversary-NAME’s new book

Honoring our 25th Anniversary-NAME’s new book


In honor of our 25th Anniversary
NAME is excited to announce the publication of this important NAME book about Multicultural Education–

“Multicultural  Education:
A Renewed Paradigm of Transformation
and Call to Action”
A major purpose of this book is to commemorate the accomplishments, endurance, and continuing existence of the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME). NAME serves as anational and international forum for examining dehumanizing issues affecting students of color and other marginalized children and youth.
 
This commemorative book includes chapters  by James A. Banks, Geneva Gay, Carl A. Grant, Sonia Nieto, Christine Sleeter, H. Prentice Baptiste, Bill Howe and others. These NAME and Multicultural Education giants address curriculum and instruction, critical examination of the politicization of education, high stakes testing, Intersectionality, Globalization of education, research trends, Multicultural Teacher preparation and much more.
Many of these great authors will be a part of the NAME Silver Anniversary Conference October 1-4. There will be many opportunities to discuss the book with them and to have your book autographed.

Book list price: $29.95
25th anniversary, pre-sale price: $25.00

The book is available by advance-sale as a part of online conference registration and will be available for sale at the conference.
If you are not attending the conference this year, to reserve your copy of the book–
Please contact Marketing@NAMEorg.org

The book is going to sell out! Be sure to get your copy and get it autographed at the NAME 25th Anniversary Conference!

Distinguished Alumni Award

2015 Teachers College/Columbia University Distinguished Alumni Award

April 11, 2015

Dr. Lyle Yorks, Associate Professor of Adult & Continuing Education AEGIS Program Director presents Dr. Bill Howe with the 2015 Distinguished Alumni Award.
Dr. Lyle Yorks, Associate Professor of Adult & Continuing Education AEGIS Program Director presents Dr. Bill Howe with the 2015 Distinguished Alumni Award.

Dr. William (Bill) Howe, Ed.D. ’91, is the State Title IX Coordinator and Education Consultant for Multicultural Education at the Connecticut State Department of Education. He is Past-Chair of the Connecticut Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs and Past-President of the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME).  He is an adjunct professor of education at the University of Connecticut, Albertus Magnus College and Quinnipiac University. In 2006  he was named Multicultural Educator of the Year by NAME. In 2008, he was recognized at the 11th annual “Immigrant Day” at the Connecticut State Capitol, a day to honor immigrants from throughout Connecticut who have made valuable contributions to their communities and/or professions. His textbook “Becoming a Multicultural Educator: Developing Awareness, Gaining Skills, and Taking Action” by SAGE won the 2013 Philip C. Chinn Multicultural Book Award from NAME.
See other awardees…

Bill Howe with Susan Furman, President of Teachers College/Columbia University. Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Bill Howe with Susan Furman, President of Teachers College/Columbia University. Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other scenes from the Academic Festival

Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield
Teachers College Academic Festival 2015, at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Saturday, April 11, 2015. © 2015 Jonathan Elderfield

Luncheon-Remarks

Luncheon-Yorks' Citation

 

 

Commencement Speech at Southern Connecticut Chinese School.

On Mother’s Day this year I was honored to give the Commencement speech at the Southern Connecticut Chinese School in New Haven. English, Spanish and Mandarin are considered by many to be the trifecta of key languages needed by workers today. They are the three most commonly spoken languages in the world. 2015SCCSGraduationCakeCutting 2015SCCSGraduationDr.Howe 11219410_10153218581950365_2997689295859745236_n 11203183_10153218581995365_4076761902622031767_n 10410822_10153218638000365_2547694896550356613_n 11258202_10153218638150365_3670008451770167717_n

With Dr. Henan Cheng, Deputy Principal of the Southern Connecticut Chinese School located at Southern Connecticut State University. Dr. Cheng is also Associate Director, Center on Chinese Education, Adjunct Faculty, Department of International and Transcultural Studies at Teachers College, Columbia University.

The Southern Connecticut Chinese School (SCCS) is devoted to Chinese language teaching. Established in 1995, with the help from the Calvary Baptist Church at New Haven and through years of the volunteered efforts of parents and a group of dedicated, motivated teachers, the School has evolved from a small after-school class with one teacher and several students to a non-profit educational institution of over 500 students from 40 towns in the Greater New Haven area.

NAME’s 25th Annual International Conference

 NAME’s 25th Annual International Conference

NAME 2015 Call for proposals is closed.
Thanks to everyone who submitted a proposal!
Look for your inviation to review in one week.

Past Achievements, Present Successes, Future Aspirations:
25 Years of NAME 

Conference Dates: October 1-4, 2015
(pre-conference events on Sept. 30)

Conference Location: Sheraton New Orleans
500 Canal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana

NAME 2015 Conference Keynotes include:

Cornel Pewewardy, NAME Founding Member and Professor, Portland State University
http://www.pdx.edu/profile/cornel-pewewardy

Geneva Gay, Author and Professor, University of Washington-Seattle
https://education.uw.edu/people/faculty/ggay

Sonia Nieto, Author and Professor Emerita, Univiersity of Massachusetts-Amherst
http://www.sonianieto.com

Estela Matriano, NAME Founding Board Member, Professor Alliant International University, Shirley Hufstedler School of Education
http://www.alliant.edu/alliant-spotlights/estela-matriano.php

 

Conference Theme:
In 1990, NAME was founded by a group of individuals that came together united by passion and vision for multicultural education to create an organization that would celebrate diversity, as well as challenge the existing social inequities. It has been the legacy of NAME to be an advocate for social justice issues in education.
NAME has been nationally recognized as one of the premier organizations focusing on social justice issues for all individuals and groups. NAME serves as a forum for scholars, practitioners, and students in both global and national origins to discuss their concerns regarding human relations. Additionally, NAME is a public voice and political advocate in many issues involving social inequalities.

The past achievements in multicultural education should not remain unnoticed. It is in these achievements that we as social justice practitioners find the courage and motivation to keep standing up for those who are marginalized. Likewise, the recognition of the ongoing struggle and successes is crucial in order to inspire current and future generations by sharing ideas and strategies that will enable the practice of multiculturalism. The diversity in the United States solidifies the necessity of a society willing to practice multiculturalism.

Because we live in an increasingly globalized community, multicultural education is becoming
more and more of a foundational knowledge. Although discussions within the schools’ curriculum have yet to include the exploitation, slavery and killing of marginalized individuals, these individuals are realizing that the injustices they are suffering will not allow them to continue into the future. Furthermore, the humanness of our society is being challenged more than ever, as it has been somewhat forgotten. Unfortunately, people do not know how to relate to one another. We still have not met the challenge of our past history as we still witness the lack of humanity in our society. Nevertheless, to ignore the positive impacts in our society, due to the vision of NAME transformed into actions, would not be fair to those who day by day commit themselves to wrestle against an unjust system. Thus, in this NAME 2015 conference, we aim at celebrating the courage and hard work of the practitioners by recognizing the past and ongoing events that give life to the vision of NAME.

Multicultural education is timeless. There is an organic relationship between the past, present, and future that cannot be ignored, because they all inform each other to evolve our NAME vision. This translates to a greater vision for a society of equity and revolutionized education. Therefore, learning from the past, celebrating the present, and ambitioning a better future, in multiculturalism, but not limited to the organization, are the basic keys for this NAME 2015 conference. Although the battle for social justice has been taking place for more than 25 years, the struggle and the passion should not subside as long as the inequities are still present. However, the praise of achievements, successes and aspirations are necessary to evaluate and celebrate where we are now as ambassadors of multiculturalism. We look forward to learn from multiple areas within social justice, and be challenged in our ways of thinking as we deconstruct our ideologies and welcome a variety of social identities from within and outside our communities.

Hello & Welcome to Multicultural Dimensions.

Founded in January, 1991

Over thirty-five years of experience as an educator and trainer in both Canada and the United States has taught me that in providing training it is imperative to offer not only a theoretical understanding of the topic, but give the participants practical skills that can be immediately applied. Training or professional development does not have to be tedious, in fact it should be enjoyable. People learn best when motivated in a positive, non-threatening environment.